Thesis defense : "Events in linguistic and musical semantics" Léo Zaradzki




"Good morning,



This Wednesday, February 17 at 10am, I will be defending my dissertation, started at LLF in September 2017 under the supervision of Jonathan Ginzburg and Christian Retoré.



The title: Events in linguistic and musical semantics.



Before a jury composed of:


Anne Abeillé (Professor, Université Paris Diderot), Examiner

Antoine Chambert-Loir (Professor, University of Paris Diderot), Examiner

Stergios Chatzikyriakidis (Senior Lecturer, University of Göteborg), Examiner

Regine Eckardt (Professor, University of Konstanz), Rapporteur

Bart Geurts (Professor, University of Nijmegen), Examiner

Jonathan Ginzburg (Professor, University of Paris Diderot), Supervisor

Pierre-Guy Plamondon (Professor, University of Versailles Saint-Quentin), Guest


Christian Retoré (Professor, University of Montpellier), Supervisor

Philippe Schlenker (Director of Research, École Normale Supérieure), Rapporteur



You are all cordially invited to attend, by respecting the barrier gestures, i.e. by connecting to Zoom thanks to the following link (only my director and I will be present in the room):


https://u-paris.zoom.us/j/81516283797?pwd=dXRGM0p6dlZQb2ZuYjBnbks3ZGF5dz09



Meeting ID: 815 1628 3797

Password : 235357



Below is a summary of what can be found in the manuscript:



This thesis is composed of two main parts. One part deals with the semantics of negation in linguistics, the other with more general and fundamental aspects of musical semantics. The linguistic part essentially contributes to highlight a particular negative construction, which we call verbal negation. This verbal negation is a kind of constituent negation on the predicate, but it differs from the classical propositional negation by a more marked syntax and semantics. We try to highlight these characteristic aspects. The musical part is devoted to the development of Schlenker's recent formal framework for the semantics of music. We propose experimental work to test and refine this model. We also develop formal tools to study the syntax-semantics interface in this theoretical framework. Each of the two parts also contains an important literature review. The whole is linked by a reflection on the notion of event (in the Davidsonian sense of the term), which is at the center of our linguistic theory (negative events) as well as of existing works in music semantics (musical events, situations).



Good day to all.


Léo Zaradzki, PhD student"